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Sam Spivack, BRYTER UK Managing Director

Should Law Students Learn to Code?

Questions like ‘will lawyers need to know how to code in the future?’ are often raised. This article looks to answer this question that is on many student’s minds.

Our UK managing director, Sam Spivack, co-authored a publication entitled “Should Law Students Learn to Code?”.

If you don’t have time to read it all the short answer is, no. No-code platforms like BRYTER mean you won‘t have to.

Lawyers will increasingly work with new technologies. But with true no-code software like BRYTER, the need to learn how to code will become less important. Most law firms already buy ready-to-use no-code solutions instead of teaching lawyers how to write code or develop software solutions themselves. Rather than spend their time learning to code, aspiring lawyers will be able to work more closely with their clients and the technical team to develop and realize digital products.

Whilst legal services can undoubtedly be scaled through the use of technology, knowing how to code will not be a pre-requisite for doing so. Instead, aside from having a good grasp of the law, future lawyers should focus on developing a fundamental understanding of how to use no-code technologies and manage projects.


To access the full article click here.